Alan P. Koretsky, Ph.D.

Headshot of Alan Paul Koretsky

Alan P. Koretsky, Ph.D.

Senior Investigator
Address
FUNCTIONAL AND MOLECULAR METABOLISM SECTION, LABORATORY OF FUNCTIONAL & MOLECULAR IMAGING

BG 10 RM B1D728
10 CENTER DR
BETHESDA MD 20814

Dr. Koretsky received his B.S. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. He performed postdoctoral work in the NHLBI at NIH studying regulation of mitochondrial metabolism using optical and NMR techniques. Dr. Koretsky spent twelve years on the faculty in the Department of Biological Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University where he was the Eberly Professor of Structural Biology and Chemistry. In summer 1999, he moved to NINDS as Chief of the Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging and Director of the NIH MRI Research Facility. Dr. Koretsky's laboratory is interested in two main areas. They are actively developing novel imaging techniques to visualize brain function and study the regulation of cellular energy metabolism combining molecular genetics with non-invasive imaging tools.

Dr. Koretsky interview in the Oral History Program : https://history.nih.gov/archives/downloads/alankoretsky.pdf

Visit the Laboratory of Functional and Molecular Imaging Website

The Functional and Molecular Imaging Section has two major research interests. One is to develop novel functional and molecular imaging techniques to study brain structure and function. Emphasis is on MRI but some optical imaging is performed as well. Current areas of interest are to extend spatial resolution and understand the relation of functional MRI to neuronal architecture. New imaging tools are being developed to image calcium influx and gene expression non-invasively in the mouse brain.

The second major research area is cellular energetics. In particular, we are interested in the role of the enzyme creatine kinase and regulation of mitochondrial metabolism. This work relies on combining non-invasive imaging tools and molecular genetics in the mouse to study mitochondrial function in vivo. Current areas of interest are to determine the role of creatine kinase in cell growth and death. We are also interested in characterizing changes in the mitochondrial proteome during changes in mitochondrial metabolism using novel two-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques.