Clinical Neuroimaging

Program Duration: 2–5 years

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Intracranial veins at 7T MRI; multiple sclerosis — postmortem 7T MRI; Susac Syndrome — subarachnoid space contrast enhancement; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS); diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).
FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Intracranial veins at 7T MRI; multiple sclerosis — postmortem 7T MRI; Susac Syndrome — subarachnoid space contrast enhancement; transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS); diffusion tensor imaging (DTI).

The NINDS Intramural Research Program has a strong focus on neuroimaging, from basic molecular imaging to human studies. In addition to imaging of specific diseases, there is an active MRI development program, as well as excellent facilities for both human and animal imaging. NINDS has access to human MRI systems ranging from 11.7 T to 64 mT, as well as a range of preclinical systems that can accommodate rodents, nonhuman primates, and tissue samples. Links with the Clinical Center Department of Radiology and clinics at NINDS allow testing of new techniques in clinical populations.

The program emphasizes the use of imaging techniques in the context of investigating mechanisms of behavior in health and disease, including noninvasive brain stimulation, structural and functional MRI, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in combination with fMRI, MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), PET scanning, and magneto/electroencephalography (M/EEG).

For clinicians interested in applications of imaging to research in neurological disorders, this fellowship offers an opportunity for combined training in advanced imaging techniques with a clinical focus. Clinical Fellows develop collaborative projects with a mentor from among the neuroimaging faculty and a relevant clinical investigator in a specific disease area. This offers the opportunity to develop and translate new MRI techniques that are based on cutting-edge research into neurological disorders.

DIRECTOR: Silvina Horovitz, Ph.D.; Staff Scientist, Human Motor Control Section, silvina.horovitz@nih.gov

CLINICAL DIRECTOR: Daniel Reich, M.D., Ph.D.; Chief, Translational Neuroradiology Section; daniel.reich@nih.gov

FACULTY